Eye Of The Storm Beach House In South Carolina

South Carolina’s beaches are nothing if not beautiful, but owning a home there comes with a big caveat: sometimes you have to weather hurricanes. Of course, you’ll be much better prepared to do so if you move into the ‘Eye of the Storm’ dome-shaped beach house. Located almost literally on the beach on Sullivan’s Island, just 20 minutes from the urban hub of Charleston – this is the first time this particular residence has been up for sale. And while the home is certainly uniquely stunning – with its large yard, 2nd & 3rd floor balconies, covered garage, Japanese soaking tub, and generous living areas and bedrooms – the highlight is certainly its construction. You see, the dome design was created specifically to withstand hurricane-level winds and rain – similar to the geodesic dome shape of mountaineering tents. That means this is likely the safest place on the island come hurricane season. The house is available now for $5 million. If you liked this beach house you should definitely check beach house in Canada and Avalon house.

Modern Beach House with Beautiful Views of the Ocean

This beautiful house of open spaces coated in fabulous wood and walls of glass, which lets us clearly set our eyes on marvelous exterior, was undertaken by architectural firm John Wardle Architects. It was designed in 2012 and was built in the Australian city of Fairhaven. In total, it occupies a space of 430 square meters. This beach house enjoys some beautiful panoramic views of the ocean and the coast nearby, with surfers frequently testing their skills against the waves. It is located in the upper part of the mountain range over Great Ocean Road on the Victorian coast. The proportions, the orientation, and the dimensions of the windows are adapted to the views available and reveal the interior spaces.

Cozy Dune House by Marc Koehler Architects

Marc Koehler Architects was commissioned to design Dune House by two brothers and their families for a sandy plot on the island of Terschelling, located off the northern coast of the Netherlands. “The concept of the house is inspired by the dune landscape of one of the northern Dutch islands in which the house is embedded. The programmatic configuration is derived from the experience of walking through the dunes; it exposes a sequence of view points on the dune landscape: from submerged and intimate viewpoints to elevated and stretched out views over the sea. The different spaces of the house are connected to each other in a continues way by a spiral route. Split-level floors – functioning as large steps – wind along the central core (used as technical space, fireplace and bookcase) of the building. This spiraling route connects the most intimate underground private spaces (bedrooms) with the living, dining and relax spaces on the upper levels. Every level has its own unique connection with the surrounding landscape. The contemporary loft-life open interior space is enclosed by a traditional facade and roof structure, to meet the requirements set by the local government. The silhouette of the house associates both to local architecture pitched and turtle roof types of neighbouring houses and the topography of the natural landscape. The house is almost entirely built out of innovative ecological materials and eco-friendly installations and is highly energy efficient. The use of a unique wooden cross-laminated structure, a unique wooden roofing system and the central heating system based on bio-fuel, reduce the CO2 footprint to a minimum.”