Gorgeous Hand-Drawn Butterfly Scarves

Spanish costume designer Alassie, of El Costurero Real, has designed light muslin scarves with beautiful, realistic, butterfly wing prints. Alassie was born in Granada into a family of seamstresses. Having studied fashion design and styling at the Art School of Granada, she moved to Barcelona where Alassie began a Masters degree in Costume Design for Theater, Movies, Opera and TV at the Istituto Europeo di Design.

Edouard Martinet’s Insect Sculptures

To get these stunning insect sculptures French artist Edouard Martinet uses part of a car, bicycle, umbrella, compass, typewriter, clock, compass and much more. The artist does not solder or weld parts but assembles them with the precision of a watchmaker, screwing them together and taking around a month per sculpture. Martinet takes about a month to make a sculpture and will often work on two or three pieces at the same time. It took him just four weeks to make his first sculpture and 17 years for his most recent completion! Some of his work will be on show at Sladmore Contemporary in London, opening November 27th.

Wonderful Kanzashi by Sakae

Kanzashi are hair ornaments used in traditional Japanese hairstyles. Kanzashi were first used in Japan during the Jōmon period. During that time, a single thin rod or stick was considered to have mystical powers which could ward off evil spirits so people would wear them in their hair. Talented artist Sakae makes wonderful Kanzashi in the form of flowers and butterflies and she doesn’t tell what technique she use for this. But once you see these extremely natural looking Kanzashi it won’t matter how she did it. Enjoy!

Unique Steampunk Insects

Since the late 1990’s style steampunk is becoming more and more popular, and not only in the literature. Various modern utilitarian objects have been modded by enthusiasts into a pseudo-Victorian mechanical “steampunk” style. And often this stylization gives very unexpected results. Like, for example, art works of american sculptor Mike Libby. His studio Insect Lab make robots from dried insects. Insects for his works come from around the world, from Africa, China, New Guinea, Brazil, Texas, etc. Each cog or gear wheel from antique pocketwatches and wristwatches are used as mechanical components. Each small robot from his collection is unique and costs a lot of money – price for the one robot ranges from $600 to $2500.