Insane Hubless Motorcycle With Airplane Engine

The TMC DUMONT is a concept art bike built and designed by Tarso Marques who describes it as a ‘hubless motorcycle with an airplane engine’. TMC DUMONT is equipped with a 300 hp Rolls-Royce Continental V6 engine from a 1960s aircraft and fully leaked 36 inch wheels. I have no idea if it can actually turn and riders should be cautious as that back wheel is frighteningly close! It’s impractical, it’s ambitious, and I think it’s awesome to see a crazy concept brought to life and actually ridden. Keep going for a video of the the thing in action, as well as a timelapse of it being constructed while I speculate if this thing is capable of turning at all. And don’t forget to check world’s fastest bikes.

L-Concept: Unique Custom Bike Inspired by Star Wars

Bandit9 makes some of the most unique motorcycles in existence, something that’s only demonstrated further by the L-Concept. Billed as a “sci-fi masterpiece,” the L-Concept sports a unibody tank, suspended engine, and maneuver controls that make you feel like you’re piloting a speeder bike on Endor. As you can see, Bandit9 continues to push the envelope, as this bike seems rooted in history but very much from the future, and if Lando rolled up in this thing in Solo: A Star Wars Story, it wouldn’t seem that insane. There will only be nine L-Concepts produced and five of those have already been claimed, so if you want a bike worthy of the Star Wars universe you better act fast. And don’t forget to check other bike from Bandit9 Eve Motorcycle.

Supercharged KTM Custom Retro Style Motorcycle

Building unbelievable works of art that also happen to be motorcycles is the everyday mission for Max Hazan and his team at Hazan Motorworks. Their latest release, a completely custom Supercharged KTM, is no exception. As the name implies, this hot rod is centered around a KTM 520 single cylinder power plant with a monsterous supercharger strapped to the head, a hefty unit that turns 85 hp at the crank. Mind bending hand-made wheels utilize very uncommon radial spokes laced through flangeless hubs, a look found more often on top level racing bicycles than motorcycles. An innovative braking system was created by Hazan specifically for this machine, which complements the tank shifter and foot clutch in a way that is anything but ordinary. Internal cable routing keep the lines clean and classful touches adorne the bike from tip to tail, like the wooden saddle, tire hugging chrome fenders, and a bitchin springer fork. Also we recommend you to check other retro bikes: Avionics V1 and 2.0 eBike

Iron Riot: Harley Softail Custom Bike by One Way Machine

Julian von Oheimb is the ower of the shop One Way Machine. He pulled out all the stops with this industrial-looking Softail, which he’s nicknamed Iron Riot. He bought a 2001-model carbureted Harley Softail Standard, in perfect condition, with just 1,400 miles on the clock. Straight away, Julian took the rigid mount, 1450cc Twin Cam motor out of the FXST frame, and dismantled the bike for a thorough inspection. The next step was to clean up the engine, transmission and oil tank. He’s kept the Softail’s original CV carburetor, but it looks even shinier than when it left the factory. The engine internals were in immaculate condition, so the powerplant has just been treated to a new air cleaner and rocker boxes, plus a new points cover. The breathing is revolutionized though, with a simple and elegant exhaust system.

Custom Cafe Racer Piaggio Ciao “Silhouette” By OMT Garage

Moped 1982 Piaggio “Ciao PX” or simply “Ciao” was highly popular in Italy and brothers Marco and Mario from Italy’s from OMT Garage decided to take it as a base for their small cafe racer. And they’ve won the “Deus Bike Build Off 2016” with their new Piaggio Ciao “Silhouette” in the category 50/125 sm3. The brothers completely modified the tiny two-stroke engine, boosting its capacity to 75 cc, from the factory’s 49 cc. They also added an electronic ignition, a 19 mm carburetor, a hand-made exhaust, plus a lightened flywheel. With the front brake now removed from the original “Ciao”, only the rear brake stops the rider after crossing the finish line. It’s activated with the left-hand lever, while the lever on the right-hand-side manages the moped’s throttle.

Death Machines of London Moto Guzzi Airtail

This wonderfully minimal Moto Guzzi ‘Airtail’ was built by Death Machines of London – a company with a refreshingly no-nonsense approach to building custom motorcycles. Death Machines of London are a small workshop that focus on crafting bespoke motorbikes that are engineered to the highest standards and offer impeccable style and visual appeal. This is the company’s first custom bike. It’s based on a 1981 Moto Guzzi Le Mans Mk2, and has been built with ‘clutter reduction’ firmly in mind. After forensic inspection of the entire motorcycle, warts and all, it was rebuilt utilising a raft of custom features including a new aviation-inspired instrument binnacle with the main switch from a Spitfire, and a lightened, polished and balanced engine. Most distinctive is the ‘airtail’ – essentially a skeleton tail section adorned only by a single rear light, taken from a Land Rover Defender, no less. Coupled with a de-lugged frame and drastically reduced switchgear, the bike’s overall character is one of minimal elegance, yet retains the poise and purpose of a classic Guzzi.

Vanguard Roadster All-New Ultra Modern Motorcycle To Get More Attention

New York based motorcycle company Vanguard Motorcycles is unveiling its first bike. The Roadster is a massive, frameless nakedbike built around and upon a giant 1917cc v-twin engine. The motor is a modified S&S X-Wedge, a 56-degree v-twin that has been built around as the central structural unit of the bike. The cylinders themselves form a kind of cradle frame, and that whopping swingarm/shaft drive bolts right on behind the rear cylinder. The upper half of the bike sits firmly on top of the cylinder heads, with the lower line of the seat and carbon tank forming a flat aluminum platform. The single-seat tail unit is almost impossibly thin, with minimal seat padding. The exhaust is fully integrated, exiting from an anonymous slot at the bottom of the bike. Other interesting touches include the dash, which is a tablet-sized color screen that also serves as a mirror thanks to a rear-facing camera integrated in the tail unit. The headlights are barely there, six tiny units (perhaps LED based – the spec sheets don’t specify) housed in transparent shards between the front forks. The overall target weight for the bike is 550 lb (250 kg), which is about 110 lb (50 kg) overweight compared to most naked bikes, but still surprisingly light given that it looks like it’s built to survive a head-on with an 18-wheeler. And while no horsepower figures are provided, that giant 117 ci v-twin will smash out more than enough torque to make this a true tarmac-ripper. At US$29,995, with production slated for 2018, the Vanguard Roadster is at the premium end of the market.