Yigal Ozeri’s Astonishing Hyper Realistic Oil Paintings

You will have to look twice to really believe that these images by Yigal Ozeri are not photographed but painted. The New York City based Israeli artist creates mesmerizing large-scale cinematic portraits of young women in vast transcending landscapes. While the level of photo detail that he manages to achieve is truly staggering, he takes us with him into a world that blends reality and fantasy with a thousand tiny brushstrokes. If you’re a real fan of such kind of painting we recommend you to check these two posts: Large-Scale Photorealistic Paintings by Hirothropologie and Unbelievable Pencil Art by Paul Lung.

Hyperrealism Colored Pencil Drawings By CJ Hendry

You may know artist Cj Hendry for her black and white work, including a Chanel perfume bottle and Kayne West’s face on a $100 bill. But for Hendry’s latest art project, she took quite a turn from black and white pieces to vibrant, color popping art. Titled Complimentary Colors, the vibrant series was commissioned by the fashion brand Christian Louboutin for an exhibition during Art Basel Hong Kong. Even though the pieces look like big blobs of paint, the only thing Hendry used for the pieces was colored pencils. It took a lot of patience, layering of the dry pigment, and expert handling of the medium, but the final hyper realistic art pieces created were so full of sheen and viscosity, you’d never believe they were created using pencils.

Large-Scale Photorealistic Paintings by Hirothropologie

Artist Hirothropologie has devoted himself to creating photorealistic paintings that are spectacularly detailed. Every freckle is emphasized along with each strand of hair. As for the clothing that he portrays, all embellishments are intricately represented and help to add a sense of texture. “I put my entire life in it,” the painter admits. Using a set of precise tools, the artist meticulously creates brushstrokes that are indistinguishable and colors that are true to life. It’s this commitment that makes the creative’s portraits as lifelike as they are. Overall, Hirothropologie’s subjects look as though they’re about to step out of his large-scale canvases and become a part of the real world.

Hyperrealistic Portraits by Diego Fazio

Diego Fazio aka DiegoKoi is an Italian artist from the town of Lamezia. Born in 1989, the self-taught illustrator first started as a tattoo artist and says he was initially inspired by the artwork of Katsushika Hokusai, a highly influential Japanese artist from the Edo period. Diego only began drawing in 2007, yet his hyperrealistic pencil drawings on paper and wood have garnered him international acclaim. Each portrait can take up to 200 hours but the results speak for themselves. At only 23-years of age, the future is bright for this rising star.

Hyper Realistic Food by Luigi Benedicenti

Today we want to show you amazing example of hyper realistic painting. Featured below pictures aren’t photographs but paintings. Their author is Italian artist Luigi Benedicenti. Born in 1948 and at the moment Luigi lives and works in beautiful Italian city Turin. On his painting you will see cakes, fruits, ice cream. And you will feel hungry for sure! Because these pictures look so realistic! Take a look!

Hyper Realistic Muscle Cars Paintings

American artist Cheryl Kelley draws only old muscle-cars. Using high-gloss oil paints the Texas-based artist manages to capture the beauty of these iconic vehicles from a bygone era better than any camera ever could. The talented artist finds her inspiration at classic car shows and museums, where she takes high-resolution photos of vintage Chevrolets, Camaros or Corvettes that she later uses as guidelines for her impressive creations. Working with glossy oil paints on aluminum panels, Kelley is somehow able to reproduce not only the tiniest details of the vehicles, but also every reflection, ultimately producing masterpieces that look more realistic than their photographic references. “The first thing that I am drawn to is the beauty. I find myself getting lost in the reflections of beautiful cars when I stop at traffic lights,” Cheryl says about her fascination with classic muscle cars. “These big engine cars, seemingly fueled by raw testosterone, were ironically most definitely feminine in form. As a twentieth century American icon, the muscle car is remembered for its speed and power. My paintings are about the feminine sensuality of the surfaces, the Mel Ramos-like perfection of female form,” – Cheryl Kelley. Enjoy!