Lagoon Tables Created By Merging Resin With Cut Travertine Marble

Designer Alexandre Chapelin of LA Table designed this intriguing series of three tables he refers to as Lagoon Tables. Each table is formed from a carved travertine base to which he adheres a special resin that forms volumes of water that appear to slice through each piece. The tables are undoubtedly influenced by Chapelin’s immediate surroundings on the small Caribbean island of Saint Martin where his studio is based.

Marble and Stone Sculptures by Matthew Simmonds

Matthew Simmonds is a sculptor and artist from Englang. From his early childhood, he was fascinated by stone buildings, an affection that flows into his artworks, where stone architecture is used as a central theme. Particularly the medieval architecture, with its striving to get to a new sophistication of space, comes alive in the marble. Simmonds makes a play of architecture and ornamentation on a small scale, but the spaces created give the same feeling as in the buildings themselves; a place to rest, a place to travel with the eye and maybe find a moment of tranquillity. The marble is opened up, and inside is a space within a building that only exists in the viewer’s mind. What you sense is the significance of space. “To create a sculpture that catches the light and structure of a building and lets the eye wander, to feel that here my eye could live, here a part of me could stay, is a great achievement. The sculptures give the viewer a different perspective on space. They look different from every viewpoint. You long to be in them, and they seem almost more meaningful for that.”

Alessandro Mendini’s Proust Chair for Marble Exhibition

Alessandro Mendini recreated his iconic Proust chair in marble for an exhibition of products shown by Italian company Robot City at Ventura Lambrate in Milan. Made for the Italian marble company’s Solid Spaces show, the new iteration of the Proust chair is an attempt to create an object with a “hyper-realist” appearance by using marble to create an “almost surreal” effect, said Robot City. Originally created in 1978, the Poltrona di Proust chair became Mendini’s best-known work. It was the first in a series known as Redesigns, which brought together his academic theories on the importance of historical context for design and the significance of surface appearances in a fast-moving world. This marble version is one of four creations by different designers produced from a single 38.7-tonne block of white marble, excavated from a quarry owned by Robot City leader Gualtiero Vanelli. The designs “give unexpected twists to the interchange between form, function, visual appearance, ergonomics, tradition and innovation”, said Robot City in a statement.

A Marble Vase with Dual Personalities

This vase, named Introverso 2, has dual personalities. Designed by Paolo Ulian and Moreno Ratti, the vase is made of solid marble that’s cut to reveal slats. At first glance, you don’t see that there’s another silhouette of a vase hidden inside with a completely different shape. Anytime you feel like it, take a hammer and chip away at the edges of the marble slats. The more you break away, the more you see of the new shape. Whether you decide to keep the original, rectangular vase or bring out the more traditional shaped vase underneath, the choice is yours.