Ornate Tableware Sculpted in Gold and Silver Filigree by Wiebke Maurer

Artist Wiebke Maurer is drawn to objects found in traditional place settings like spoons, bowls, saucers, and tea cups, but her interpretation of these pieces leaves function behind, resulting in delicate sculptures that fuse the past and present. Working primarily with gold and silver the pieces seem almost impossibly delicate, reduced to the most decorative aspects found in silverware design. “I’m fascinated by historical European works of silver, gold and porcelain,” says Maurer. “I explore traditional ways to design objects, not to stick to tradition but because I use tradition as my starting point for my creative strategies. I’m not concerned about the restoration of the broken object: I want to deconstruct it, to reach the heart of its integrity and reinvent it, both formally and functionally.”

Elegant Papier-Mâché Lamp Sculptures

For nearly 10 years, Sophie Mouton-Perrat and Frédéric Guibrunet have combined soft lighting with delicate paper craft to create ethereal sculptures. Working under the name Papier à êtres, the duo uses the papier mâché technique to construct life-sized women clad in elegant, billowing gowns that double as lamps. The top portion of the unconventional, all-white lantern features the ladies’ upper bodies while their pleated skirts illuminate the space. To produce these creations – which have been displayed in locales like the Paris Opera House – Mouton-Perrat and Guibrunet work in true collaboration. They are each responsible for half of the sculptures: Mouton-Perrat shapes the figures and concentrates on characters’ facial features, hair, dress, and graceful poses, while Guibrunet develops the base and lighting. Once assembled, the couple’s handiwork is a stunning fusion of art and technology. Although it appears as one cohesive piece, their individual contributions shine at separate times. When the lights are off, Mouton-Perrat’s beautiful details are visible. Once it’s dark, however, the exquisite yellow glow is all that’s seen.