Miniature Sculptural Airships From Cardboard

Netherlands-based artist Jeroen van Kesteren has created these sculptural airships as part of a series titled "Orphanage for Lost Adventures". Made primarily from cardboard, aluminum foil, adhesives, and an assortment of papers used for sails and propellers, the whimsical flying machines have a distinct steampunk feel. The pieces range in 40 to 50 centimeters tall and take about a month to make.

A Kinetic Sculpture Mimics a Walking Person

With spindly legs that look like an upturned spider, this experimental kinetic artwork by Random International relies on the viewer to watch from just the right perspective to reveal a hidden secret. Each of the 15 ‘arms’ is tipped with white LEDs that collectively move to mimic the motions of a walking human figure. Titled Study for Fifteen Points, the piece was created to examine the “minimal amount of information that is actually necessary for the animated form to be recognized as human.”

Olympic Athletes Crafted From Layers of Paper

Barcelona-based paper artist Raya Sader Bujana designed these fantastic serial plane paper figures in collaboration with photographer Garcia Mendez for an Olympic themed stock photography shoot. Each figure is cut from up to 150 pieces of paper joined by hundreds of tiny 3mm separators to create the delicate layering effect.

Figurative Wooden Sculptures by Stefanie Rocknak

It may be hard to believe, but these stunning sculptures were carved from a single piece of wood. Artist Stefanie Rocknak is behind these fascinating figurative works. These pieces are slightly larger than lifesize, torsos and heads twisted into intense expressions that can be seen in both the face and body. Each work is incredibly serious, the pupil-less eyes seeming to look right through the viewer. The New York-based artist’s sculptural practice is highly influenced by her many trips to Europe, especially by Michelangelo, Donatello, and Bernini who she experienced in Rome. Although trained as a painter, she fell in love with the warmth and unpredictability of wood, preferring three dimensional work over two. Rocknak likes to stick to the detail of the work’s physical creation explaining that “conceptual art leaves me cold. So my figures, quite intentionally, are immediate and obvious; ideally, they do not need a theory to do their talking.”

Unique Sculptures Made from Keys and Coins

Even discarded keys and coins can be turned into beautiful art with some creativity and the right sort of know-how. Australian artist Michael (or Moerkey) does exactly that, turning discarded keys and coins into bottles, lampshades and other beautiful recycled metal sculptures. “When I was supposed to be cleaning out my shed, I came across some old copper pipe saved from a previous renovation. I cut it up into rings and started making it into spheres,” Michael explains on his Etsy shop. “The first ones were a bit rough but once I worked out the technique I got creative. I’m a bit of a hoarder and searched around for all those old keys and copper wire, that were no longer needed, and got creative with them as well,” he added.

Life-size Sculpture from Steel Disks by Valay Shende

Transit is a 2010 sculpture by Mumbai-based artist Valay Shende depicting a life-size work truck that carries figures of 22 people. Created over a period of 18 months, the piece was constructed from thousands of reflective stainless steel disks that have been individually spot welded together. Shende conceived of Transit as commentary on a dramatic rash of farmer sucides in India over the last decade. The truck’s rearview mirrors display video footage of roadways in London, Mumbai and Dubai, as if the vehicle is moving from the perspective of the driver’s seat but in reality it remains stationary. Transit is currently on view at the Mumbai City Museum.

Sculptural Playground Forest Loops in Japan

Suppose Design Office have designed Forest Loops, a sculptural playground in Hamakita, Japan. “The concept of this project is an implementation of natural forests. Forest is an representation of growth in nature, it is growing/expanding day by day and lies in between the definition of complete and incomplete. Majority of the existing architecture projects shows a sense of completion once the building is completed. For Forest Loops, we are inspired by the growing idea of forest. We tried to expand the possibilities of usage and interactions that can connect with visitors and residents. (For example, if you place a net to the structure, it will become a play land for kids. If you add a tree house, it can turn into a residential architecture for people to live.) The project will continue to grow and expand its possibilities of usage and interaction.”

Old Hubcaps Recycled Into Stunning Animal Sculptures

For over twelve years now, Brighton, UK-based artist Ptolemy Elrington has been morphing discarded hubcaps into amazing animal sculptures. Within his work he concentrates on creating sculpture of natural forms from found and re-cycled materials. At the moment he is working with a variety of materials including shopping trolleys, scrap metal and car wheel trims which he re-shapes into a variety of life forms. “Hubcap creatures are made entirely from re-cycled materials. All the hubcaps are found, usually on the side of the road, and therefore bear the scars of their previous lives in the form of scratches and abrasions. I believe these marks add texture and history to the creatures they decorate.”

Exceptional Steampunk Sculptures by Igor Verniy

From heaps of scrap metal, old bike chains, and silverware, Russian metal artist and steampunk sculptor Igor Verniy creates birds, butterflies, and other unusual creations. Many of his steampunk and cyberpunk sculptures are made to be fully articulated, with dozens of moving or adjustable parts enabling each piece to be posed in several lifelike positions. “The 22-year-old master Igor Verniy graduated from Moscow State University, he is an engineer in the field of metal, a specialist in the evolution of stars and astrophysics. Igor Verniy writes on his page: “In the 21st century there are still fans of old school ideas. These are people who are nostalgic for rusty metal, gears, and the smell of motor oil.” Igor is one of those True Metal fans.

Enormous Horse Head Sculptures Illuminate the Scottish Skyline at Night

Towering 30 meters (nearly 100 feet) above the ground, The Kelpies consists of a pair of enormous horse head sculptures installed by artist Andy Scott in Falkirk, Scotland. Scott spent a total of nine years designing and then assembling the sculptures on-site, crafting steel parts into intricate busts that allude to the legendary Scottish water spirit that takes the form of a horse. Colorful lights around and inside the steel works illuminate their magnificent shapes in the darkness, further enhancing the beauty of the Scottish landscape. For Scott, the project’s location in his father’s hometown of Falkirk, the cultural tale of kelpies, and Scotland’s industrial past compelled him to take on the project as a source of national pride. “The artistic intent is built around a contemporary sculptural monument. Water-borne, towering gateways into The Helix, the Forth & Clyde canal and Scotland, translating the legacy of the area into proud equine guardians,” he says. “I see The Kelpies as a personification of local and national equine history, of the lost industries of Scotland. I also envisage them as a symbol of modern Scotland—proud and majestic, of the people and the land. They are the culmination of cutting edge technology and hand crafted artisanship, created by our country’s leading experts through international partnerships.” Photos by dswainphoto.

Gigantic Sculpture on Széchenyi Tér

A gigantic man crawls out from the earth in this spectacular outdoor sculpture titled Feltépve (“ripped up” or “popped up”) by Hungarian artist Ervin Loránth Hervé. Crafted from polystyrene, the larger-than-life sculpture was temporarily installed in Budapest’s Széchenyi Square for the Art Market Budapest art fair that took place earlier this October. With an expressive, snarling face, the colossal figure looks like he is erupting from a deep, underground lair, pulling up the lawn so that he can escape into the open air. The sculpture, which is rendered in subdued shades of gray associated with the earth and nature, is completely selfie-comptabible according to the artist, as Hervé encourages viewers to circulate pictures of themselves and the installation on social media. “I think that this is a truly contemporary piece of artwork, in an extremely large size. My goal was to show people that pieces of contemporary art can be integral parts of a city, that they can become one of its building blocks,” the artist says. “I say that many more contemporary sculptures should be displayed on the streets of Budapest. I’m positively sure that not only tourists would love them, people living in the city would too. Let’s dare to create!”

Wire Tree Sculptures by Clive Madison

Using nothing but wire, sculptor Clive Madison creates tangled trees that grow from wooden bases into dense clusters of leaves and branches. The trees are handmade from single strand wires that run from the roots to the leaves. No glue, solder or other means are used to hold them together, it is purely down to the way the strands are twisted. The beauty of this art is that no two sculptures are the same. There may be similarity of style between pieces, material used, or type of tree being represented, but the way they are made means that every sculpture will be unique.

Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight

UK sculptor Robin Wight creates dramatic scenes of wind-blown fairies clutching dandelions, clinging to trees, and seemingly suspended in midair, all with densely wrapped forms of stainless steel wire. “Inspired by an inexplicable real life encounter, these galvanized or stainless wire sculptures make the perfect statement piece for the bottom of any garden. Every fairy is a handmade sculpture uniquely crafted to your desired pose and installation requirements.”

Marble and Stone Sculptures by Matthew Simmonds

Matthew Simmonds is a sculptor and artist from Englang. From his early childhood, he was fascinated by stone buildings, an affection that flows into his artworks, where stone architecture is used as a central theme. Particularly the medieval architecture, with its striving to get to a new sophistication of space, comes alive in the marble. Simmonds makes a play of architecture and ornamentation on a small scale, but the spaces created give the same feeling as in the buildings themselves; a place to rest, a place to travel with the eye and maybe find a moment of tranquillity. The marble is opened up, and inside is a space within a building that only exists in the viewer’s mind. What you sense is the significance of space. “To create a sculpture that catches the light and structure of a building and lets the eye wander, to feel that here my eye could live, here a part of me could stay, is a great achievement. The sculptures give the viewer a different perspective on space. They look different from every viewpoint. You long to be in them, and they seem almost more meaningful for that.”

Beautiful Glass Sculptures by Ben Young

Ben Young is a self-taught sculpture artist with over 10 years experience, based in Sydney, Australia. Being passionate about sculpting with glass for so long, Ben’s work is completely by hand, sheet after sheet of cautiously cut pieces of glass. “I work with 2D shapes and have to figure out how to translate that into a 3D finished product. Sometimes my start point changes dramatically as shapes can be limited – I can’t create any internal right angles – so I have to find a way to layer the glass to create certain shapes.”

“Too Much?” Dining Table Made of Money

The very first impression from this stunning table would be undoubtedly slight bewilderment. Called “Too Much?” this table by Atelier Amarist and Alejandro Monge is a perfect example of when contemporary art and design become one. The sculptural dining table, consists of a glass cube containing partially burnt notes with a thin biofuel flame rising above its surface. Each intricate detail was taken into consideration as the artist meticulously reproduced the bills by gluing and coloring each individual piece of paper. “The most complicated part of the process was to simulate the effect of burnt paper eaten by flames never using fire to achieve it,” artist said. The furnishing is meant to provoke deep thoughts within the mind of the viewer about the significance and value of money, time, and people. “A note is a dyed piece of paper that represents a number, 10, 20, 50 dollars, yens, euros. A figure that we exchange in order to acquire something wanted. A figure that within itself has no more value than the one given to the job or the time traded,” said Monge.

Great Mercedes-Benz Sculpture by Gerry Judah

Artist Gerry Judah has created a sculpture for Mercedes-Benz as part of the Goodwood Festival of Speed 2014 in West Sussex, England. “Mercedes-Benz can trace its motorsport origins back through three centuries, to 1894, when Daimler engines powered the world’s first winners on the rough roads of France. It’s appropriate then, that this year’s sculpture at Goodwood Festival of Speed represents that enormous span through thirteen decades. Soaring 26 metres over Goodwood House, this 160-tonne steel sculpture is 90 metres long and was created by artist Gerry Judah. It was 80 years ago when the legend of the German racing “Silver Arrows” was born. Stripped of their lead-based white paint, the 1934 Mercedes-Benz W25 – like the example installed here – won at its first outing at the notorious Nürburgring Nordschleife, with Manfred von Brauchitsch at the wheel – and since then, the company’s works cars have always been silver. The other Silver Arrow soaring overhead is the MERCEDES AMG PETRONAS Formula One Team’s F1 W04. This car, chassis number 04, was raced in 15 Grands Prix in 2013 by Lewis Hamilton, most notably to five Pole positions; to victory in the Hungarian Grand Prix; and to third place podiums in Malaysia, China and Belgium.”

Portable Cities by Yin Xiuzhen

In her work “Portable City” artist Yin Xiuzhen collects clothes worn by people in different cities and uses them to create miniature models of them inside a suitcase. To provide the viewer with the whole experience, the suitcase also plays a tape with the local soundscape. In times where many people are traveling on a regular basis, being at home everywhere and nowhere, the project is an interesting attempt towards the thought of “living out of one’s suitcase” and the actual loss of our local identity and culture.

Mystic Sculptures by Livio Scarpella

Inspired by the sculptures in the Sansevero Chapel in Naples, Livio Scarpella creates work in the sensibility of the great masters. Scarpella maintains the soul of the classics in these works, matching the light and dark color of the figure, respectively with amethyst or quartz. Reminiscent of Michelangelo’s The Prisoners, these gentle busts unveil the ghost within.

Alain Bellino’s Bronze Sculptures

Alain Bellino was born in Nice in 1955. In the 80’s, he discovered the world of metal and ornamentation in his father’s workshop where he learn gold and silver plating and bronze restoration. After many years of practice and technical research dedicated to rehabilitating and re-composing objects, he engaged in an artistic way around 2010. The ornament that is torn from its original support then becomes the very structure of his sculptures. Bronze ornamentations assembled by extremely precise welding are the base material. Weighted with the nobility of the material joined to their own history, they support a fragmented memory and they bring to the sculptor a precious help as well as a constraint. Alain Bellino gets special inspiration from the Renaissance period. Vanitas are one of his favorite themes, typical of classical sceneries. In his work of re-directing and re-assembling, which is both iconoclast and highly rigorous from a formal point of view, at the crossroads between past and future, Alain Bellino sublimates and rehabilitates the ornamentation.