The Narcissus Desk by Sebastian Errazuriz

Designer Sebastian Errazuriz continues his reign of creating unforgettable functional pieces that double as sculptures which also make you think. The latest is The Narcissus Desk, a desk that will let you gaze at your reflection all day long. The desk’s inspiration came from a Caravaggio painting of Narcissus that Errazuriz remembers seeing with his father, an art teacher, as a child on a trip to Italy. The painting made him think about the idea that someone could stare at their reflection but not necessarily be aware that they were looking at themselves. In today’s times, with everyone’s obsession with selfies and being “our own perfectly edited online self”, we tend to forget about the real person that exists outside the screen. The desk offers the user a moment of reflection, where we spend most of our days and tend to make the most important decisions in our lives. Errazuriz found a broken French desk from around 1880 and completely restored it. He then cut a semi-circle out that lets the user fit inside the desk. The top is now a mirror letting you take a moment to reflect on yourself and your life, and perhaps the occasional good hair day.

Kinetic Explosion Cabinet by Sebastian Errazuriz

The Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) has acquired Explosion, a new kinetic cabinet by Sebastian Errazuriz. Explosion will be one of the centerpieces of the exhibition Sebastian Errazuriz: Look Again, which opens September 6th. “Inactivated, Explosion sits as a tidy, beautiful credenza. Transparent glass sidewalls provide a glimpse inside this intriguing but staid box. Further exploration of the central vertical seam reveals an entirely different object: With a gentle push, the rails slide further and further open until it seems that the cabinet has exploded beyond the bounds of stability. It is “a beautiful, surprising, and confounding work that represents the playful conceit of the master cabinetmaker showing off,” added Delphia. Even as Explosion’s exterior expands outward, it retains beautiful geometric proportions, using mechanics so complex that they took more than a year to perfect, despite borrowing one of cabinetmaking’s oldest tricks, the sliding dovetail. This new work will join a selection of important objects representing the breadth of Errazuriz’s practice in Sebastian Errazuriz: Look Again, his first solo museum exhibition.”

12 Shoes for 12 Lovers by Sebastian Errazuriz

“12 shoes for 12 lovers” created by New York-based designer Sebastian Errazuriz reflects on the recollection of the artist’s personal and sexual relationships with former lovers, each of whom became the influence for a series of shoe sculptures. Each day, Errazuriz released one image of a new heeled design, completed by an accompanying photo of the footwear’s muse and a small, often explicit story about the duo’s escapades together. All nicknamed according to their distinctive idiosyncrasies, peculiarities, and character traits, the women and their narrative are materialized through each wearable. “12 shoes for 12 shoes” will exhibit at the pop-up shop of Brazilian shoe brand Melissa from December 6th, 2013 to January 6th, 2014 for Art Basel Miami Beach 2013. If you like such lists you should definetely check our list of the most expensive shoes of the world.

Spectacular “Space Bowls” by Sebastian Errazuriz

New York-based Chilean artist and designer Sebastian Errazuriz made planets closer and smaller than you think. His spectacular series "Space Bowls" features Earth, Moon and Sun. Small scale food plates with photographic planetary prints of the Sun, Moon and Earth. Made in partnership with Kikkerland, these designs for the dining table are a cool backdrop for sci-fi inspired lomographs. Fantastic art work! If you want to buy these bowls you can do it here fo $25.

Magistral Cabinet By Sebastian Errazuriz

New York-based artist and designer Sebastian Errazuriz represent his new creation – the Magistral Cabinet. This amazing sculptural cabinet comes with a protective layer that’s made of 80,000 bamboo skewers. The protective layer sits like a protective armor that safely houses your personal items inside. A team of 12 woodworkers took 6 weeks to hammer each skewer into the carved wooden structure. There is a set of concealed doors, which slide open to reveal its inner mechanisms and the compartments.