When Sculptor Helps To Create A House: Private Residence in Québec, Canada

The 1,700-square-foot home is located in Bolton-Est, Québec, Canada and is a collaborative work between client, sculptor Jacek Jarnuszkiewicz and architects Marie-Claude Hamelin and Loukas Yiacouvakis from YH2. “The project was conceived following the guidelines of the surrealist’s exquisite cadaver where each designer builds upon the work done by the previous one. Each sculptural proposition was debated among the designers until verticality, as a strong and clear expression of the given landscape’s essence, was agreed upon as the core concept of the project. Located on a vast land overhanging lake Trousers, it is surrounded by a chiaroscuro coniferous forest. Once the compositional rules established, the project was developed from the hand of one creator to the other, from volume to plan, from the handling of materials and masses to the upgrowth of interior spaces. The fractioning of masses, the composition of two wood volumes, one light and one dark, the opacity and transparency structural games all make the house unite with nature and nature integrate the interior spaces of the house. The open plan of the house offers a natural fluidity and continuity between the forest’s ground level and the lower floor of the house, between interior and exterior. The experience offered by the mezzanine lounge on the last floor is completed by a large covered terrace that simultaneously is a wildlife observation tower and a panoramic belvedere. It opens itself to the mountains and overlooks the nearby lake. Vertical composition reminiscent of the mature trees surrounding it, the house opens itself to daylight and to the majestic scenery thanks to the large glass facade covering the three floors. Expressed tectonics where spatial composition overrides functionality, it is a sculptural house in nature.”

The Two Hulls House in Nova Scotia, Canada

Located in a glaciated landscape on the coast of Nova Scotia in Canada, the Two Hulls House integrates into the natural environment but also enhances this striking area with its creative design. The project was completed by Canadian studio, MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects, and the result is a unique living space with superb views, rooms flooded by natural light, and an exterior that reminds of the hulls of two ships placed on cradles at the beginning of winter. The two structures are connected by a common foyer and the kitchen, but each they have their own purpose; one houses the daytime areas, including a living room and an office, while in the other section bedrooms and bathrooms provide privacy away from the socializing spaces. Both pavilions end in large glass sliding doors and balconies that create the impression of being suspended above the water, offering breathtaking views across a coastal landscape where granite bedrock and immaculate white sand are washed away by clear blue water. The main entrance is framed by grass and vegetation, the middle by tall pines, while the one facing the beach features a concrete wall which protects the home from rogue waves and fierce coastal winds. Wide stairs lead towards the pristine beach. Underneath the cantilevered sections, outdoor areas are cleverly protected from harsh weather. The innovative design of the house was made possible by the use of a steel frame and concrete fin foundations; wooden board cladding reminds of the nautical inspiration and of vernacular architecture at the same time, lending the contemporary home a touch of rural warmth. The interior features the same blend of rustic and modern; wood appears throughout, along with concrete floors and leather furniture. Huge windows allow natural light to brighten the space, but the living room is particularly striking as the double-height ceiling and the glazed wall add a monumental feel to the space. A large fireplace acts as both a functional and stylish addition to this social area, while the owners’ contemporary art collection truly stands out in the minimalist décor.

The Canadian: Ghost Train Crossing Canada

Young and talented photographer Jeff Friesen just completed a photography project called “The Canadian: Ghost Train Crossing Canada” that involves a train’s journey across Canada but with an unexpected twist. "I carry the train rather than it carrying me. It fits into a shopping bag." The unique series shows us the vast, diverse and beautiful landscapes of Canada in a sweet and enchanting way. At first glance you will be sure that you’re looking at an actual, real-life train. But in fact we’re invited to imagine what small and mysterious creatures could possibly be enjoying such a wonderfully scenic trip. Enjoy!