Mix of Stone, Concrete, Glass and Wood – The Wall House in Portugal

Take a look at this stunning private residence by Guedes Cruz Architects. Like a wall in a Castle not in stone, but in concrete, glass and wood. Not to for protection but because of the neighbours and the strong Atlantic Wind. A Patio house with a Mediterranean country culture in the hardness Atlantic Coast. A big Window opens to the golf and scenery sea views can be seen from the interior and exterior spaces. Two exterior pool’s located in the patio crossing each other, one in the ground and the other in the air.

Stone, Wood And Glass: SV House In Albosaggia, Italy

Natural stone, wood and glass are used by architect Rocco Borromini to build a modern house that reinterprets tradition and creates a strong connection with the surrounding dwellings. Located in Albosaggia, Italy, SV House enjoys stunning views of the Alps. It is built on the ruins of an old rustic structure and follows the same simplicity in design as vernacular architecture, with an emphasis put on modernizing the traditional silhouette. The stone walls are connected by a slab of reinforced concrete, while at the upper level, the use of wood gives the house a rustic look and feel. The small footprint of the structure was maximized. On the ground floor, there’s a kitchen and a cozy living room with a fireplace. The wooden stairs with transparent landings lead to the first floor that contains a bedroom and bathroom. The master bedroom, located on the third level, has the most striking feature of the entire house: a large window, overlooking the countryside and the mountains in the distance. In terms of materials, everything is kept simple and natural. Luserna stone, brushed larch and naturally split local stone are complemented by glass and copper. Light floods the entire living space through large windows that establish a dialogue between the interior and the incredible mountainous landscape.

Hillside Holiday Glass Homes in New Zealand

Made entirely from glass, including the floors, walls, and ceiling, these small off the grid  PurePods offer visitors to New Zealand an experience unlike any other. There are three locations, with each pod siting out in the open on land situated an hour or two from Christchurch , they’re completely secluded from the rest of the rest of civilization and let guests connect with nature in a way they’ve never been able to before. To get to your PurePod, you take a short hike to your private oasis and are left to your own devices for the remainder of your stay. Despite their off-the-grid nature, these pods provide a luxurious stay and include all of the amenities you would find in a normal hotel room. There’s a small kitchen and dining area for cooking and eating, as well as games and reference books to help keep you entertained when you aren’t exploring. There’s a bedroom with crisp linens and a comfortable bed, with three sides of the room surrounded by glass. In the bathroom, there’s a flush toilet and a shower with amazing views of the valley. Once the sun has tucked behind the mountains for the night, it’s time to get into bed to see the stars in a way you’ve never seen them before. The glass ceiling and lack of light pollution mean you’ll get to experience the cosmos in all of their glory, twinkling, shining, and shooting all night long. During the day, 360 degree views of the breathtaking landscape surrounding the pods, and the complete isolation from the rest of the world helps you feel like you’ve really escaped from every day life. No phone service, no roads, and no people mean you can enjoy nature and the company of of whoever you bring with you to the fullest.

The Glass House by Santambrogio Milano

This Glass House is designed by Santambrogio Milano, located in Milan, Italy. Beautiful and modular, it’s designed to be a flexible living space that brings the drama of nature right into the decor. “The woodland house rests on land with the scent of sun and rain. It erects the development of its transparencies till it looks onto the tops of the branches of ancient trees. The house on the sea lives the landscape. It bears witness to the succession of natural phenomena, responsive to their contrasts, reflecting and integrating into its transparencies the anger and peace of the elements.”